1904 APBA Gold Cup [second running]

Races for Power Boats

Competing Craft Will Be Started According to Handicap Allowances

Races for the American Power Boat Association Challenge Cup have been arranged for Sept. 22, 23 and 24, on the challenge of the Manhasset Bay Yacht Club to the Columbia Yacht Club. The start will be made at 2 o'clock each day off the Columbia Yacht clubhouse, Eighty-sixth Street and North River, the course being sixteen miles up the river to a mark off Piermont and return.

It has been arranged to start the competing boats on their handicap time. The boat receiving the greatest time allowance will be started at 2 o'clock and the others at the expiration of time which they allow the first boat. Each contestant will know his position throughout the race and will know just what boats he must pass in order to win. it is expected that this will make the races more interesting to the spectators.

The committee having charge of the races consists of Frederick A. Hill of the Norwalk Yacht Club, representing the Manhasset Bay Yacht Club; F. J. Stone of the Columbia Yacht Club, and H. DeB. Parsons of the American Yacht Club was chosen Chairman by the other two members. The winning boat will be determined by the point system, whereby each of the contesting boats receives one point for going over the course and an additional point for each boat which she defeats. The following entries have been received:

Shooting Star, Manhasset Bay Yacht Club, H. A. Lozier Jr. 
Marcirene II, Cape May Yacht Club, Commodore J. W. Allison
Challenger, Audubon Yacht Club, Smith & Mabley
Vingt-et-Un, Chippewa Yacht Club, W. S. Kilmer
Mercedes U.S.A., Rhode Island Yacht Club, H. L. Bowden
Macaroni, Atlantic Yacht Club, C. L. Tangeman
Josephine, Jamaica Bay Yacht Club, A. J. Buschmann
Logarithm, Sachem's Head Yacht Club, F. N. Waterman
Mercedes IV, American Yacht Club, W. K. Vanderbilt Jr.
Flip, Hartford Yacht Club, C. D. Holmes
Speedway, Columbia Columbia Yacht Club, C. L. Seabury
Water Lily, Yonkers Corinthian Yacht Club, Frank Seaman.

(Transcribed from the New York Times, Sep. 18, 1904, p. 10.)